The Springs Stewardship Institute, a global initiative of the
Museum of Northern Arizona, works to improve communication among land managers, to survey, rehabilitate, and steward springs systems across the southwestern U.S. One day, the entire globe.

Although they are among the most biologically and culturally important and highly threatened ecosystems on Earth, springs are poorly studied and inadequately protected. Though relatively small in comparison to lakes and oceans, springs support more than 20% of the endangered species in the United States. With an immense potential for collaboration and partnership, SSI will continue to improve understanding and management of these critical and endangered ecosystems.


About

Find out more about our mission, staff, and our partnership with the Museum of Northern Arizona.

Learn More →

Museum of Northern Arizona

Learn more about the Museum and our history.

MNA Website →

With improved and consistent tools, techniques and data, humans can be better stewards of the aquifers which supply springs, and ultimately contribute to the livelihood of some of the most diverse and important ecosystems on Earth.
— Dr. Abe Springer, via National Geographic

Upcoming Workshops


Recent HEadlines

Dr. Abe Springer speaks about the importance of springs stewardship and the utility of the Springs Stewardship Institute's Springs Database in an article featured in National Geographic

Dr. Abe Springer speaks about the importance of springs stewardship and the utility of the Springs Stewardship Institute's Springs Database in an article featured in National Geographic

Wandering Salamander Baffles Scientists

"The tiger salamander was almost a foot long, with black markings decorating its mud-brown body. Larry Stevens, senior ecologist with the Grand Canyon Wildlands Council, found the animal lazing in the shallow water of a marsh bordering the Colorado River last week..."