Historic spring box constructed over the source in the 1930s.

Coyote Springs, located on Museum of Northern Arizona grounds, is one of the last functioning springs in the San Francisco Peaks. With funding from the Coconino County Board of Supervisors, we will rehabilitate this spring to restore its ecological functionality. This will involve removal of an old, non-functional concrete tank that was installed decades ago at one of three sources.

Flow will be diffused onto the wet meadow to restore ecological functionality of the spring.

 

During rehabilitation efforts, we will preserve and protect an historic spring box located at the primary source. Trained SSI staff and volunteers will demolish the concrete tank manually, or if needed, use heavy machinery.

Panoramic view of Coyote Springs

Panoramic view of Coyote Springs

SSI staff will then redesign the stream channels to increase diffuse flow into the wet meadow, and re-plant native wetland vegetation to restore the plant community. We will also construct a new trail segment that will link the spring with the adjacent trail system.

Recently SSI set up cameras to record wildlife use of the spring. Visitors have included coyote, squirrel, and deer. Elk frequently are seen at this site, and an occasional mountain lion passes through, according to a local resident.

Check back to see what other visitors we might photograph over the coming weeks. You can also donate to SSI to support this restoration effort. All contributions are tax deductible, and any amount will help.

 

Is the coyote chasing the deer, or vice-versa?

A herd of deer comes to the spring for water in the late evening.

A herd of deer comes to the spring for water in the late evening.